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Month: April 2019

Magazine Street Headshots and Portraits at Zack Smith Photography Studio!

April 24, 2019

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Saturday, May 11th from 5p-9p come to my New Orleans photography studio at 4514 Magazine Street for your FREE fast, furious, fantastic headshot while you sip on complimentary champagne. It’s the Magazine Street Champagne Stroll and you’ll want to be where the bottles, lights, and popcorn is POPPIN’. (seriously I am buying a damn popcorn machine right now…). Since 2001, I have made the streets, sidewalks, and neighborhoods of New Orleans into impromptu and creative portrait shoots, and this will be my most creative yet! I will have multiple backgrounds, lighting schemes, and many many new ways to MAKE YOU SAY CHEESE. ok? Don’t believe me? GO HERE…

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival 50th Anniversary Museum Exhibit!

April 23, 2019

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I am honored to have seven photographs in this unique museum exhibit celebrating “50 years of New Orleans Music and Culture” as Jazz Fest turns 50. Starting in the early 2000’s I enjoyed a wonderful relationship with Relix Magazine and most notably Jambase.com, as they provided a wide outlet to showcase my early editorial photography. My New Orleans photography was able to be featured in both magazines as I was getting my start in the city documenting just about everything. I covered Jazz Fest for Jambase.com from around 2004-2008, and soon after was offered a staff photography position by Jazz Fest in 2009. From 2009-2016 I photographed Jazz Fest with a creative reckless abandon both night and day, going through rolls of film and digital cameras day in day out. As a New Orleans photographer I made precious contacts and kindled long term relationships with so many wonderful people and culture bearers that I keep to this date.

Here’s the press release from Relix.com

This year’s New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival will mark the 50th annual iteration of the legendary gathering, and Relix is heading down to Crescent City for a celebration of all things Jazz Fest. Our “50 Years of New Orleans Music & Culture” exhibit at The New Orleans Jazz Museum will feature art and photography from an array of NOLA staples and will host a series of special conversations and events featuring some of our favorite New Orleans-based musicians.

The exhibit will open on April 26, the first Friday of Jazz Fest, and remain at the museum throughout May. The afternoon conversations will kick off on Monday, April 29, with a chat on New Orleans history and music with Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s Ben Jaffe, who also serves as the Creative Director for the band’s namesake building, and writer Walter Isaacson, professor of history at Tulane University and former Chairman/CEO of CNN and Managing Editor of Time Magazine. The following day will feature a presentation from renowned keyboardist/singer-songwriter and longtime New Orleans transplant Jon Cleary, who will offer a musical trip through the history of piano in New Orleans. The series will then wrap up on May 1 with a conversation between two funk icons, Galactic drummer Stanton Moore and legendary Meters bassist George Porter Jr. Relix editors Dean Budnick and Mike Greenhaus will serve as moderators at the events.

Included in the Jazz Museum exhibit will be art and photography from the likes of Michael P. Smith, Sydney Byrd, Danny Clinch, Frenchy, Eric Waters, Clayton Call, Jay Blakesberg, Zack Smith, Scott Saltzman, Dino Perrucci, Marc Millman and Michael Weintrob, along with memorabilia from past Jazz Fests, including a chronological presentation of every official poster from the festival’s five decades.

Relix will also be hosting nighttime events at the museum during Jazz Fest featuring live interviews and panels with iconic members of the New Orleans music and Jazz Fest scene—followed by intimate performances—along with local chefs and mixologists helping to highlight the legendary food and drink culture of the Big Easy.

Read more:https://relix.com/news/detail/announcing-relix-celebrates-50-years-of-new-orleans-music-culture-at-jazz-fest-2019/#ixzz5lvcnYg3U

Best of Fest - 10th Annual French Quarter Fest 2019 Photo Gallery

April 21, 2019

This year marked my 10th year photographing French Quarter Festival for the amazing team at French Quarter Fest Inc. Ten years really does go by fast when you have fun doing your job. I am constantly humbled and honored to be able to be put into the best role to document this one of a kind festival. Being able to be trusted to tell the story of a music festival that is solely centered on Louisiana music is a privilege I cannot understate. Each year that goes by I get better and more efficient at seeing the magic before it happens and being in the right spot for it. After all these years I know the times, locations, and light patterns of the French Quarter in the 2nd week of April like no one else does…and that feels good to have the camera ready!

For years I have enjoyed bringing you this gallery of my BEST OF FEST – so enjoy and spread the link if you like what you see! These images are for your enjoyment only – feel free to share THIS LINK to share the joy. If you see yourself in any of these images let me know, and I’ll send you a copy! No images may be used to promote any 3rd party services or businesses.

** BIG UPS to Stephen MacDonald for carrying a Paul C Buff Einstein, beauty dish, and battery for 2 days straight! I couldn’t light up those shadows without ya!

 The Kinfolk Brass Band led the opening day Second Line to start the 36th Annual French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

The Kinfolk Brass Band led the opening day Second Line to start the 36th Annual French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

I love shooting the opening day second line. Each year at least 4 brass bands pepper the streets of the French Quarter blowing loud and proud. This year the talented Kinfolk Brass Band led the charge down Bourbon Street, straight to the heart of Jackson Square. Each year I challenge myself to get a new angle, a new look, or a new story in the often over shot French Quarter. As a New Orleans photographer who has shot brass bands and the French Quarter so many times, the goal here is to keep challenging myself to find ways to showcase the moment for my client, but also find a new layer of light, color, and expression of joy in the same frame.

 ZSMITH-2019-04-11-9551.jpg The low rising sun can be troublesome shooting down the blocks of Bourbon Street. Though it’s nice to find it bouncing off fresh polished cymbals and horns. ©Zack Smith Photography

The low rising sun can be troublesome shooting down the blocks of Bourbon Street. Though it’s nice to find it bouncing off fresh polished cymbals and horns. ©Zack Smith Photography

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Tips on shooting outdoors in alternating light conditions

As I am making this post I thought I would throw in a little “how to photograph light” section. Bare with me photo lovers, this is for the learners…Each block during this second line presents it’s individual challenges. When the parade starts at 10am-ish, the sun is just high enough above the horizon to shine light down each cross street of Bourbon, all the way until the parade turns at St. Peter (or sometimes St. Ann, depending on which police officer you ask that day). At the “turn street” you get some of the most magical shots since the light on the band is warm and golden while the background houses and blue sky are lit up perfectly by the sun. Your challenge until then is to go back and forth on exposures to prioritize your subject. Once you get the hang of it you can actually sink back into photographing and not thinking too much!

 Light beaming through the streets of New Orleans has it’s challenges, and then again has it’s rewards. ©Zack Smith Photography

Light beaming through the streets of New Orleans has it’s challenges, and then again has it’s rewards. ©Zack Smith Photography

A New Orleans photographer in his wheelhouse

My tenth year shooting French Quarter Fest was not really known to me until I started doing this blog post. But as I walked around this year there was a heightened sense of nostalgia mixed with purpose. I was set on getting to certain stages and areas when the light was perfect while hitting my marks and clearing my shot lists. I made sure that I was at Dwayne Dopsie’s set towards the end as I knew he’d go out into the crowd. I showed up late to Bruce Daigrepont, but I was able to lineup a sweet backstage portrait. This year I made the most of every opportunity wether I showed up early or late to a set, I was there in the moment and that’s all that counted. Catching a soundcheck can be just as glorious as the set itself…

 Preservation Hall Brass open Day One at the French Quarter Fest Hilton stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

Preservation Hall Brass open Day One at the French Quarter Fest Hilton stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Glenn Hall Jr and Lil Glenn and Backatown opened up the Tropical Isle stage on Thursday. This was also my 10th year photographing this talented soul!

Glenn Hall Jr and Lil Glenn and Backatown opened up the Tropical Isle stage on Thursday. This was also my 10th year photographing this talented soul!

 Washboard Chaz and The Tin Men setup to play at the GE Capital Stage on Day One. ©Zack Smith Photography

Washboard Chaz and The Tin Men setup to play at the GE Capital Stage on Day One. ©Zack Smith Photography

 One of my favorite compositions: Band + Crowd + Riverboat + Blue Sky. Tin Men open up the day at the GE Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

One of my favorite compositions: Band + Crowd + Riverboat + Blue Sky. Tin Men open up the day at the GE Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Artist and Designer Ashley Porter poses inside her Mirror House at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

Artist and Designer Ashley Porter poses inside her Mirror House at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Cha Wa perform at the Abita Stage at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

Cha Wa perform at the Abita Stage at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

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Photographing Friends, photographing new orleans

If you live here long enough and document the music culture of New Orleans, you make some friends along the way. Photography becomes personal and almost takes on the feeling of a “family photo” as you document the same creative souls year-in year-out. You watch their evolution and joy through the center of your lens like a movie unfolding in front of your eyes. Your only hope is to do them equal visual justice to the sounds they’ve given you over the years.

 Cajun musician Bruce Daigrepont poses backstage for a quick portrait. ©Zack Smith Photography

Cajun musician Bruce Daigrepont poses backstage for a quick portrait. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Jon Cleary plays to a packed French Quarter as he closes out Day One at the Chevron Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

Jon Cleary plays to a packed French Quarter as he closes out Day One at the Chevron Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Galactic closes out the Abita Stage during their first appearance at French Quarter Fest! ©Zack Smith Photography

Galactic closes out the Abita Stage during their first appearance at French Quarter Fest! ©Zack Smith Photography

French Quarter Fest Day One was a wrap! Here’s a few more pics!

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day two of French Quarter fest: longer days means more moments

Day one of shooting any music festival is what I call “getting my festival legs”: my goal is to find ways to stay on target with my shot list while being creative, walking fast and effective, as well as staying hydrated. Here are some of my favorites from Day 2 – festival legs and all.

 kinfolk-brass-band-zack-smith-new-orleans-photographer-french-quarter-festTorrence Taylor dances at Joe Lasties’ set, giving bow to a beautiful soul and crushing drummer! ©Zack Smith Photography

Torrence Taylor dances at Joe Lasties’ set, giving bow to a beautiful soul and crushing drummer! ©Zack Smith Photography

 Drummer Joe Lastie is all smiles, as he usually is! If you don’t know Joe - GO SEE JOE! ©Zack Smith Photography

Drummer Joe Lastie is all smiles, as he usually is! If you don’t know Joe – GO SEE JOE! ©Zack Smith Photography

 Chance Bushman of the NOLA Jitterbugs gives his daily swing dance lessons as he does so effortlessly! ©Zack Smith Photography

Chance Bushman of the NOLA Jitterbugs gives his daily swing dance lessons as he does so effortlessly! ©Zack Smith Photography

 Audacity Brass Band tore it up at the new LA Fish Fry Stage at the U.S. Mint. ©Zack Smith Photography

Audacity Brass Band tore it up at the new LA Fish Fry Stage at the U.S. Mint. ©Zack Smith Photography

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So many moments, so many faces! Seen here in the gallery below are: Haruka Kikuchi, Wendell Brunious, Roger Lewis and Percy Ellis, Delfeayo Marsalis and Brice Miller, drummer Paul Thibodeaux, Gal Holiday, Brice Miller and Brice Miller Jr., Jeffrey Broussard.

 Quiana Lynell performs at the Hilton Stage, and cracks her own band up in the process! Such a powerful new voice in jazz! ©Zack Smith Photographyn n nn n n

Quiana Lynell performs at the Hilton Stage, and cracks her own band up in the process! Such a powerful new voice in jazz! ©Zack Smith Photography

 kinfolk-brass-band-zack-smith-new-orleans-photographer-french-quarter-festSunpie Barnes closes out the Chevron Stage. You can ask him too…it was definitely feeling a bit like summer that day. ©Zack Smith Photography

Sunpie Barnes closes out the Chevron Stage. You can ask him too…it was definitely feeling a bit like summer that day. ©Zack Smith Photography

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grammy winners Lost Bayou ramblers close out in blue hour…

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day three of French quarter fest: let the crowds get cozy…

Saturday of festival usually means that everyone is off of work, kids are out of school, and the French Quarter is the city’s second home. The lawn chair and blankets create a landscape that cover the festival grounds like a patchwork maze while the kids play tag and weave in and out of food and drink lines. For a photographer trying to cover alot of ground, you have to make use of your time photographing the moments when you get it. Alot of your day is spent walking, dodging, and just plain “cutting through” the crowds.

 Trumpeter and bandleader Desmond Venable lead students and fire up the crowd. ©Zack Smith Photography

Trumpeter and bandleader Desmond Venable lead students and fire up the crowd. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Will Smith serenades with the Storyville Stompers Brass Band. ©Zack Smith Photographyn n nn n n

Will Smith serenades with the Storyville Stompers Brass Band. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Chance Bushman and the Ibervillianaires had the swing dancers swinging early at the Traditional Jazz Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

Chance Bushman and the Ibervillianaires had the swing dancers swinging early at the Traditional Jazz Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

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 Bryan, Louis, and Kirkland are seen lugging their gear to the Michot Melody Makers set. Hard workers. (Period) ©Zack Smith Photography

Bryan, Louis, and Kirkland are seen lugging their gear to the Michot Melody Makers set. Hard workers. (Period) ©Zack Smith Photography

Festival Moments from an action packed Saturday

Cyril Neville, Dwayne Dopsie, Mia Borders, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, “Bangkok Swing” dancers, Paul Lafleur

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 Dwayne Dopsie and Paul Lafleur get low into the crowd for one of the greatest send off’s ever on Saturday. ©Zack Smith Photography

Dwayne Dopsie and Paul Lafleur get low into the crowd for one of the greatest send off’s ever on Saturday. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Flow Tribe close out Saturday night’s festival at the Chevron Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

Flow Tribe close out Saturday night’s festival at the Chevron Stage. ©Zack Smith Photography

Day four french quarter Fest: The big finish of festival

Sunday is sometimes just another day. But for me, the last day of a festival is your last chance to tell the story by any means necessary. You walk from the Aquarium to the U.S. Mint and back all day if you have to. Just get get the shot, and finish big.

 Maggie Koerner performs at French Quarter Fest amongst a sea of fans and the Mississippi River. ©Zack Smith Photography

Maggie Koerner performs at French Quarter Fest amongst a sea of fans and the Mississippi River. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Drummer Simon Lott performs with Jesse Morrow on Royal Street in one my favorite music moments of my 10 years shooting French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography (below: Brad Walker and Jesse Morrow)

Drummer Simon Lott performs with Jesse Morrow on Royal Street in one my favorite music moments of my 10 years shooting French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography (below: Brad Walker and Jesse Morrow)

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 Brice Miller brings joy and funk to his set at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

Brice Miller brings joy and funk to his set at French Quarter Fest. ©Zack Smith Photography

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Anthony and Rockin’ Dopsie always make people dance and get up! Great seeing these consummate performers! ©Zack Smith Photography

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that’s a wrap! looking back at four days of hustle and creativity.

Being in the right time in the right place sometimes takes, well, ten years and sometimes more. Pictured above is Debbie Davis, the Daquiriu Queens, Maggie Koerner and Jason Jurzak in their zone, in the place that they shine. Oh, and the Lucky Dog shot? I don’t know, it’s just so….New Orleans right? There were shots that I anticipated this year, and some shots I downright just missed. What often helps me get over that is just enjoying the moment where I’m at and making the most of what is in front of me, cause you are always missing something amazing! I hope you enjoyed this gallery! Please share and credit the culture!

 Rockin Dopsie mid air in a full split? One of my “bucket list” shots…done. What a performer and all around great dude. ©Zack Smith Photography

Rockin Dopsie mid air in a full split? One of my “bucket list” shots…done. What a performer and all around great dude. ©Zack Smith Photography

 Tired photographer post-fest with gear. Photo by Matt Owens.

Tired photographer post-fest with gear. Photo by Matt Owens.

Helpful Tips for Shooting In Low Light Without a Tripod

April 17, 2019

Best practices of how to photograph in low light without a tripod

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As a professional photographer and even a hobbyist, you’ll often need to take photos in extreme low light conditions. And as if that were not enough; sometimes you even have to shoot without a tripod. I have always said that my favorite time of year is right around daylight savings time when the fog creeps up from the Mississippi River and low swamp lands. I love March, especially since we can get more chances to shoot the city in this wonderful golden hour photography since the sun doesn’t set at 5pm anymore!

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Want to know how I got these Firework shots? Take my class…go HERE to learn How to Photograph Fireworks in New Orleans!

As you find yourself shooting outside more and more, you might find yourself leaving the house without some important photography tools! Maybe you’re in the middle of a the French Quarter with no space for a tripod or in a location where tripods are not allowed. Or perhaps, you don’t want to let your tripod draw unwanted attention when photographing musicians or street documentary.

In any case, low light photography without a tripod is challenging but definitely not impossible. After years of shooting without one (I STILL DON’T LIKE TO!) Here are the best practices of low light photography without a tripod.

What is ISO and how to use it in low light

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ISO is an important tool in every photographer’s arsenal, but you need to know when to leverage it. In low light conditions, for instance, you can increase your camera’s ISO to make the camera’s sensor more sensitive to light. That way, your camera will need less light to make a good exposure. You will also be able to hand hold at faster shutter speeds, thus decreasing the risk of shake from hand holding the camera.

One downside to this trick is that raising the ISO too high could affect the sharpness of your image. The higher the ISO, the more “noise” will affect your image.  That means you should have a fair idea of the maximum acceptable ISO value for your camera in low light conditions. This needs some practice, and some research. I would recommend photographing different low light scenes at all of your ISO’s up to the expanded numbers as well just to see what effect they have. Don’t just look at the back of your camera! You should download the test images to your computer and view there!

In my last 15 years teaching photography I have seen so many cameras, and it’s a good idea to start at ISO 800. Most cameras will capture good photos at ISO 800 in low light conditions, but if you raise your ISO beyond 800 or 1600, the image could start to get noisy. So know your camera’s acceptable limit and adjust the ISO setting accordingly.

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How to use aperture settings in low light

Who doesn’t love that blurry bokeh? Using a wider aperture means you’re letting in more light to your lens, which is ideal for low light photography. To that end, consider using a fast lens. The faster the lens, the larger is its maximum aperture.

For instance, invest in a prime lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.8 or f/0.95. If you’d use a 300mm lens, then look for one with a maximum aperture of f/2.8.

Also, a faster lens allows you to use faster shutter speeds in low light conditions, which means you’ll have more leeway to shoot without a tripod.

But when you’re shooting at f/1.8 or f/2.8, remember that you’ll have a narrow depth of field. Make sure you’re focusing on the most important part of your frame rather than trying to keep everything in focus.

How to use a speedlight as fill flash

Imagine your scene has some ambient light, but not enough to properly illuminate your subject. So the background is fairly bright, but your subject is shaded. In situations like this, you can use a speedlight as your fill light to fill in the dark shadows on your subject.

But balancing the flash light with the ambient light could be a challenge (more on this later). A strong front flash could overpower the background ambient light, making your subject look flat and overly bright against a dark background.

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But you don’t want to kill the natural look in your photo. You just want to add some fill light to your subject in the foreground. Here are some ways you can soften your fill flash.

  • Bounce your flashlight against the ceiling or wall, rather than aiming it directly towards the subject. You can also use a reflective card for the purpose.

  • Use a diffuser on your Speedlight to reduce the harshness of your flashlight   

  • Switch from TTL to manual flash mode to gain more control over the intensity of your flashlight.  

  • Dial down the flash exposure compensation to -0.8 or lower.

When to “drag the shutter” and how to use it!

When using fill flash in low light conditions (like in the above example), dragging the shutter has two benefits.  

  1. It helps balance the flash light with the ambient light.

  2. It allows you to create a motion effect in your photos.

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The shutter drag technique is based on a simple fact that when you change your camera’s shutter speed, it makes an impact on your ambient exposure but doesn’t affect your flash exposure. That’s because the flash operates much faster than your camera’s shutter.  

In other words, you can control your flash and ambient lights separately in the same shot. For instance, if you drag the shutter from 1/60th to 1/30th, you’ll get a brighter background, but the flash exposure on your subject in the foreground will remain the same.

This helps you balance flash light with ambient light, simply by adjusting your shutter speed. Ideally, you should first set exposure for the ambient light, and then add some flash fill and adjust your settings accordingly – rather than the other way around. This takes practice…so get out there!

Dragging the shutter often introduces a motion blur at the edges of your subject when you are working with a shutter speed of 1/10th of a second or slower. You can use this technique intentionally to create a sense of movement in your photos. When marching or walking the same speed as your subject (like the Tulane Green Wave Band during Mardi Gras) you can use your movements to create motion but you have to make sure you are going the SAME SPEED as your subject!

Like these tips? Help me spread the word and pass them on! Share this page and stay in touch!

 

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